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Police: Man accused of brutal beating of boy hopes the two can be friends

An Arizona man accused in the brutal beating of his girlfriend's 4-year-old son admitted to injuring the child, but claimed it was "in a playful manner," police said.

Steven Darrell Nelson, 25, was arrested Tuesday on child abuse charges for an incident that took place in early February, police told

>> Read more trending news 

The child suffered multiple injuries, including a broken leg, a lacerated liver and a perforated bowel, reported. In addition, the child suffered extensive bruising and had his hair pulled out by the roots, according to court documents.

The boy's mother denied that she or Nelson abused the child, but the child allegedly told police, "Steven hurt me," reported.

According to court records, Nelson admitted to police that he injured the child, but said it was "in a playful manner." Nelson told police he hoped he and the child could be friends one day, reported.

Nelson is being held on a $50,000 bond, according to the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office.

Police: Mother accused of drinking in car, firing gun while kids in backseat

A domestic dispute led to a woman's arrest in Albuquerque Thursday, police said.

>> Read more trending news 

Davona Chavez, 21, was allegedly upset because her ex-boyfriend accused her of damaging his girlfriend's car, KOB reported. She allegedly told police that she had a few shots of Hennessy, put her three children in the backseat of her car and drove off. 

At some point, Chavez allegedly stopped the car in the middle of the road and fired a shot in the air, police said. No one was injured. An officer who heard the shot followed Chavez and arrested her, KOB reported. 

Chavez is being held without bond, according to the Bernalillo County Sheriff's Office.

Man arrested in burglary of Patriots TE Rob Gronkowski's home

One man was arrested and two suspects are being sought in the burglary of Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski's house.

>> Read more trending news

While the Patriots were playing in Super Bowl LII in Minneapolis on Feb. 4, police were called to Gronkowski's house in Foxborough, Massachusetts, for a burglary. 

According to a heavily redacted police report, the break-in at Gronkowski's home happened just five minutes after he scored his first of two touchdowns.

The report shows the burglary happened at 8:50 p.m., during the third quarter of the Patriots' game against the Eagles.

On Friday morning, police executed a search warrant at the home of Anthony Almeida in Randolph. As a result of the search, police arrested Almeida, 31, on charges of breaking and entering, two counts of receiving stolen property, and malicious destruction of property.

He was arraigned Friday afternoon. 

>> Rob Gronkowski’s house burglarized during Super Bowl

Almeida pleaded not guilty to the charges and was released on $5,000 bail. He was ordered to stay away from the victims and is due back in court on April 20.

Police said 26-year-old Shayne Denn of Tewksbury and 28-year-old Eric Tyrrell of Foxborough are still at large.

Police said an Apple watch, a Rolex watch and two rare coins from the 1800s have been recovered. A firearm has not yet been recovered.

According to the police report, the burglars were not able to get into Gronkowski's bedroom; it was found locked and secured.

The investigation is ongoing, police said.

Mom who killed kids after husband asked for divorce gets 120 years in prison

An Indiana woman who stabbed her two young children to death after her husband asked for a divorce in 2016 has been sentenced to 120 years in prison.

Brandi Worley, 31, of Darlington, was sentenced Monday in a Montgomery County courtroom. The Journal Review in Crawfordsville reported that Worley was quiet as she learned her fate, and she did not make a statement.

The Indy Channel reported that Worley pleaded guilty to two counts of murder in January. 

Worley stabbed her children, Tyler, 7, and Charlee, 3, to death in a bedroom of her family’s home while her husband, Jason Worley, slept downstairs. Jason Worley told his wife he wanted to end the couple’s seven-year marriage two days before the Nov. 17, 2016, slayings, according to authorities. 

Jason Worley took the stand during his now-ex-wife’s sentencing hearing, the Journal Review reported

“For me, those children were my life,” Jason Worley said. 

He described Tyler as a loving, energetic first-grader who loved sports.

“He was one of those (people) who could walk into a room of strangers and walk out with 20 new friends,” Jason Worley said

Charlee loved dressing up and having her hair braided, her father said. 

The murders came to light when Brandi Worley called Montgomery County 911 early in the morning on the day of the attack. When the dispatcher answered her call, she calmly told him what she did. 

“I just stabbed myself and I killed my two children,” Worley says in the audio of the call, which was made public shortly after the murders. 

“You stabbed yourself and killed your two children?” the male dispatcher repeats incredulously. 

“Mmm-hmm,” Worley responds. 

“Okay, and what’s your name?”

“Brandi Worley.”

The dispatcher asks where the children are, and Worley, whose speech is somewhat slurred, responds that they are on the floor in her daughter’s room. The dispatcher continues asking questions between moments of silence, at one point asking Worley why she killed her children.

“My husband wanted a divorce and wanted to take my kids,” she responds. “I don’t want him to have my kids.”

Worley, who is calling from her living room, tells the dispatcher she stabbed herself in the neck.

“Are you bleeding?” he asks. 

“Yeah, there’s blood everywhere,” Worley says. 

Asked about her husband, she says he is downstairs in the basement. The dispatcher asks about Jason Worley’s condition. 

“I don’t know, I haven’t talked to him,” she responds. 

The dispatcher asks Brandi Worley what she feels, and she says she’s tired.

“I took a lot of Benadryl,” she says. 

She tells the dispatcher that, prior to calling him, she called her mother, who told her to call 911.  

Montgomery County prosecutors said that it was Jason Worley’s mother-in-law’s screams of horror that woke him that morning. He ran upstairs and found her in the kitchen, and his wife in the living room.

“That’s when I heard (Brandi) say, ‘Now you can’t take my children from me,” Jason Worley said, according to the Journal Review

Montgomery County Prosecutor Joe Buser laid out a timeline of what happened, saying that Jason Worley told his wife he wanted a divorce on Nov. 15. The following morning, Brandi Worley took the children and spent the day with her mother.

That afternoon, Jason Worley, a software engineer, returned from work and the family went to Charlee’s dance practice, Buser said. After dinner at home, Brandi Worley went to Walmart, telling her husband that she needed pipe cleaners for a school project Tyler was working on.

Instead of pipe cleaners, she bought a knife, the Journal Review reported

>> Read more trending news

When she returned home, she hid the knife in Tyler’s bedroom before going into the living room, where she and her husband played with their children together before Jason Worley put them to bed for the last time, the newspaper said. 

Buser said that early the following morning, Brandi Worley woke Tyler up for a “sleepover” in his little sister’s room, the Journal Review reported. In Charlee’s bedroom, she straddled her son and stabbed him repeatedly.

Charlee awoke at one point and asked what her mother was doing, the prosecutor said. When Brandi Worley told her “nothing,” Charlee went back to sleep. 

Once Tyler was dead, Brandi Worley stabbed Charlee to death. Their autopsies showed both children were stabbed multiple times, the Journal Review said

Worley then stabbed herself more than once in the neck, but survived.

“She was more adept killing her small, sleeping children than killing herself,” Buser said. 

Defense attorney Mark Inman said there was no clear-cut reason that the murders took place. He told the Journal Review that his client showed emotion during their first few meetings, but became more stoic after that.

“That’s the only way she can deal with it at this point,” Inman said. “She doesn’t know why she did it.”

In court on Monday, Jason Worley was asked what sentence he would like to see his ex-wife receive. 

“All I care is to never see her again,” he said, according to the newspaper. “Out of sight and out of mind.”

Brandi Worley’s individual sentences were 55 years for her son’s murder and 65 years for killing her young daughter. The sentences are to run consecutively, or one after another. 

She is now housed in the Rockville Correctional Facility, according to state prison records

Massachusetts teacher accused of sexually assaulting 6-year-olds in dark room

A Massachusetts teacher was arrested, charged with inappropriate sexual contact with children, according to the Brewster Police Department. 

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Noah Campbell-Halley, 36, allegedly had “inappropriate sexual contact” with children, police said. Officials said parents initially told them about incidents between children and the technology teacher at Stony Brook Elementary School. 

Campbell-Halley has been a technology teacher at Brewster's Stony Brook Elementary School for five years.

Campbell-Halley was charged with two counts of rape and is accused of inappropriately touching two 6-year-old students during school in a small room off the main classroom.

"That room is what we characterize as the room in question that several of the kids describe as the dark room where the teacher, the defendant, would take these students where the touching took place,” Assistant District Attorney Ben Vaneria said.

Campbell-Halley is also being charged with one count of witness intimidation after one of the victims came forward saying Campbell-Halley threatened him if he told anyone what had happened. 

The allegations stemmed from an incident that happened during school hours, police said. 

Police said they found two additional potential victims and determined sexual contact had taken place with at least two of the alleged victims. 

The superintendent of the Nauset Public School District placed Campbell-Halley on administrative leave when he learned of the allegations. He released a statement that says, "We take matters such as these very seriously and have acted immediately to ensure the physical and emotional safety of all students."

During the investigation, Brewster police said they have learned there may be more potential victims.

"If there are other victims out there, we certainly want to hear from them," Brewster Police Chief Heath Eldredge said. "We will be available to assist those families and provide resources as necessary."

Noah Campbell-Halley is being held on a $25,000 cash bail and is due back in court on April 20.

Florida maintenance man recorded people in office restrooms, police say 

An office maintenance worker in Florida is accused of putting video cameras inside the building’s restrooms to record people, The Tampa Bay Times reported.

>> Read more trending news

John Phillip Gibbs, 49, was arrested on nine counts of video voyeurism, a felony, according to Pinellas County jail records. Bail was set at $90,000, according to the arrest report.

The probe began March 2 when police were called to a Pinellas Park office building to investigate a “suspicious incident” inside one of the women’s restrooms, the Times reported. Police found two cameras above the ceiling tiles inside two different women’s restrooms, the newspaper reported. There was video inside the cameras, police said.

Gibbs was captured on some of the videos, police said. Detectives have identified 14 people on video, although some have not been identified yet, the Times reported.

Former mayor of California city arrested for violating protective order

The former mayor of a California city was arrested Thursday for violating the terms of a protective order issued against him, KTXL reported.

>> Read more trending news

Anthony Ray Silva, 43, who was the mayor of Stockton, faces charges of being in possession of a registered gun at his home. The protective order, issued by Amador County, mandated that he was ineligible to own a gun, KTXL reported.

“Mr. Silva was unaware of this legal restriction and was in possession of legally registered weapon,” Silva’s attorney, Allen Sawyer, said in a statement. “That is the basis of his arrest."

Arrest records show that Silva was booked into the San Joaquin County Jail.

Silva reached a plea deal last August after facing misdemeanor charges that he illegally recorded a game of strip poker played among teenage camp counselors at his Stockton kids camp in Amador County in 2015 and contributed to the delinquency of minors by providing alcohol to them, KTXL reported.

Tennessee man cleared of conviction after 31 years in prison awarded $1 million

A Tennessee man cleared of a rape and burglary conviction after spending 31 years in prison was awarded $1 million by the Tennessee Board of Claims, The Tennessean reported.

>> Read more trending news

Lawrence McKinney, 61, was awarded the cash after a unanimous vote by the board. He was released from prison in 2009 because of new DNA evidence that cleared him of rape and burglary charges handed down in Memphis in 1978.

McKinney will receive $353,000 up front to pay his attorney fees and debts and also to buy a vehicle, the Tennessean reported. The remaining $647,000 will be distributed in a monthly annuity that will pay McKinney $3,350 per month for life beginning on May 1, the newspaper reported. 

The payment is guaranteed for a minimum of 10 years. If McKinney should die within that span, the balance will be paid to his wife, or his estate if she also does not survive, the Tennessean reported.

The $1 million award is the maximum amount the board was allowed to allot for McKinney. Gov. Bill Haslam granted an executive exoneration to McKinney in December.

“We want to thank the board and the governor for standing by this man and seeing that justice was done,” said David Raybin, one of McKinney’s attorneys. "No amount of money can compensate somebody for that long a time (for wrongful imprisonment), but it's the statement that it makes that is important as well …”

‘Gun! Gun! Gun!’ Body cam, aerial video shows police kill unarmed black man 

Sacramento police officials have released the harrowing audio and video, including footage from two officers’ body cameras, in the shooting death of an unarmed black man killed by police Sunday night

Stephon Alonzo Clark, 23, was shot multiple times in the backyard of his grandparents’ house, where he lived with several siblings. Sacramento Police Chief Daniel Hahn previously said the two unnamed officers involved in the shooting, who are on administrative leave while the case remains under investigation, fired on Clark 20 times. 

The footage was made public after it was shared with Clark’s family, per department policy. 

The body camera footage shows that the officers opened fire upon Clark seconds after encountering him on his patio. It also shows that, while the two officers involved ordered Clark to show them his hands, neither identified themselves as police officers. 

Clark’s aunt, Saquoia Durham, told The Sacramento Bee that her nephew did not stand a chance. 

“As soon as they did the command, they started shooting,” Durham told the newspaper. “They said, ‘Put your hands up, gun’ and then they just let loose on my nephew. They didn’t give him a chance to put his hands up or anything, and then when they shot him down, they knew they messed up.”

Family members and local activists also wondered why one of the videos shows, about six minutes after the shooting, an officer saying, “Hey, mute.” Officers are then seen muting the microphones on their body cameras for the rest of the recording released to the public. 

A police spokesman told the Bee there are a number of reasons officers may choose to mute their microphones, but did not go into detail. 

The officers who shot at Clark said they believed he was armed, but all that was found with his body was a cellphone. The killing has sparked protests and demands from Clark’s family and friends, as well as Sacramento officials, for answers about why an unarmed man was killed outside his own home. 

The Bee reported that the Rev. Al Sharpton has been in touch with Clark’s family and plans to travel to Sacramento to help ensure that Clark has a proper burial. The family has established a GoFundMe page to help fund his funeral arrangements, which include being buried next to a brother also cut down by gun violence, the Bee reported

>> Related: 20 bullets fired: Police kill unarmed black man holding cellphone in own backyard

Clark’s grandparents and other family members were inside the house as the shooting took place. His grandfather called 911 after hearing the gunshots, and his grandmother, Sequita Thompson, said she only learned the dead man was her grandson when she looked out the window after hours of police questioning on what she heard that night. 

“I opened that curtain and he was dead. I started screaming,” Thompson told the Bee

The shooting and the events surrounding it are laid out in the audio and video released Wednesday night, beginning with a 911 call from a resident in Clark’s neighborhood. The caller tells a dispatcher that there is a man going through the neighborhood and breaking vehicle windows, including those on the caller’s truck. 

“What did he use to break the windows?” the dispatcher asks.

“I have no idea,” the man responds. “I heard the noise and I came outside and he was standing right there on the side of my truck, and I grabbed my ball bat … (unintelligible) … I didn’t hit him, or nothing like that.”

The caller tells the dispatcher that the man is now in another yard, trying to get over a fence, but that he is trapped because of a neighbor’s dogs.  

The dispatcher asks for a description of the man, and the caller tells her he could not determine the man’s race because of the dark hoodie he was wearing. The suspect was wearing pants that appeared to have white stripes or dots on them, he says. 

During silent periods in the call, at least one dog can be heard barking in the background. The dispatcher continues to get the scant details of the vandal’s appearance: he’s tall, at more than 6 feet, and thin. 

The dispatcher tells the caller that the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Office is sending a helicopter to search for the man and keep an eye on him until city police officers arrive. The weekend was a busy one because of St. Patrick’s Day, she says. 

The caller, a mechanic, tells the dispatcher that he keeps his tools in his truck, so the sound of his windows being broken alarmed him. 

“He’s lucky to be alive, if I would have gotten a hold of him,” the caller says, laughing. 

At that point in the 911 call, the officers who would shoot and kill Clark were about a block and a half away, according to the dispatcher. 

Audio from the dispatch office gives a glance into the same time frame from the viewpoint of law enforcement officers. The dispatcher relays a description of the accused vandal, and a male voice from the helicopter overhead mentions two large dogs as the only heat sources he can see on the infrared camera. 

A few minutes later, the deputy in the helicopter comes back on, telling the responding officers below he sees a man looking in the window of a home. 

“Two yards to the south of you, I’ve got a guy in a backyard looking into their window,” the deputy says. “He’s picking up a -- looks like a toolbar, or some sort of thing. He might be trying to break the window. Stand by.”

A moment later, the deputy says, “Okay, he’s breaking the window! Running south! Running to the south!”

The footage from the circling helicopter does not show Clark smashing the window, but picks up immediately afterward. The deputy is relaying his movements as Clark, seen only as a white figure in the camera’s infrared vision, jumps onto what appears to be a shed and vaults over the fence into his grandparents’ yard. 

At that point, he stops running and walks up to a vehicle between the fence and his grandparents’ home, briefly looking inside. 

As the helicopter continues to circle, the two police officers on the ground can be seen on the road in front of Clark’s grandparents’ home. One of the officers spots Clark and begins to run toward him, gun drawn. 

His partner follows and, as both officers run in his direction, Clark goes around the corner into the backyard of the house. Both officers follow, with one running into the open for a second before grabbing his partner and taking cover at the corner of the house. 

The officers huddle there and, as the helicopter’s camera gets a full view of the backyard, shots can be seen fired from the officers’ guns. 

Clark falls to the ground on his grandparents’ patio as the bullets ricochet off the pavement around him. He appears to try crawling away before becoming still. 

“Shots fired! Shots fired!” the deputy in the helicopter says. 

“Copy, shots fired,” the dispatcher responds. 

One of the officers on the ground, sounding out of breath, tells the dispatcher that the man is down, with no movement. He requests that backup officers arrive from a specific direction and asks that fire medics be en route. 

The officers have been criticized for waiting five minutes, until backup arrived, before rendering aid to Clark. Fire medics pronounced him dead at the scene. 

At one point, the dispatcher asks the officers if they also need medics. 

“Negative,” an officer responds. “Neither one of us are hit, we’re okay. Suspect’s down.”

The footage from the officers’ body cameras prior to the gunfire starts out quiet, as they make their way through the neighborhood, searching for the man suspected of vandalizing people’s vehicles. In the videos, the officers are seen asking a neighbor’s permission to search her backyard for the man. 

As they search, the dogs heard in the original 911 call are much closer. The officers clear a shed before heading back onto the street. 

A few moments later, the officers begin running toward the area where the deputy in the helicopter spotted Clark looking into the vehicle window next to his grandparents’ house. 

“Show me your hands! Show me your hands! Stop!” one officer screams at Clark when he spots him. He runs after Clark, who is heading around the corner toward the patio.

As the officer rounds the corner, he again screams, “Show me your hands!” and, “Gun!” before pushing his partner back.

As both officers huddle at the corner, the same officer yells, “Show me your hands! Gun! Gun! Gun!” 

They then both open fire.

See the body camera footage from both officers, beginning when they first spot Clark, below. Warning: The images and language may be disturbing for some readers. 

Footage from the second officer’s body camera shows his hands holding his service weapon around the corner of the house as he and his partner unleash a barrage of bullets. It is not clear from the location of his body camera, which would be attached to his chest, if the second officer could see who he was shooting at. 

The second officer’s body camera captured the fiery blasts from his partner’s gun as the gunshots rang out. 

“Five seven, shots fired,” the first officer breathlessly tells the dispatcher. “Subject down.”

Over the next few minutes, the officers continue ordering Clark to show them his hands, with no response.

The second officer says that Clark was “still pointing” when he saw him prior to the shooting. They both spend a few moments quietly trying to catch their breath, during which time the officers determine that neither of them was shot.

The officers agree to do a “tactical reload,” a maneuver in which law enforcement officers reload recently-fired weapons with fresh, full magazines to ensure they don’t run out of ammunition. The second officer estimated that he fired his weapon about five times, though his body camera footage shows more.

Hahn has previously said that each officer fired 10 times. 

The second officer’s body camera footage shows that additional police officers began to show up about that time, with one officer asking if the suspect had a gun. 

“We haven’t secured it,” the second officer said. “We’re not moving in until we have more (backup).”

The first officer is also heard saying, “(Clark’s) still down, he’s not moving. We can’t see the gun.”

>> Read more trending news

The officers tell their colleagues that Clark walked toward them with his hands out in front of him and that he held something that looked like a gun. 

As the officers speak, their flashlights highlight Clark’s body, lying face-down on the patio. They continue to search from a distance for a gun.

They also continue to try to get a response from Clark. 

“Hey, can you hear us?” one officer yells. 

“We need to know if you’re okay,” a female officer says. “We need to get you medics, but we can’t go over there to get you help unless we know you don’t have your weapon.”

They continue trying to speak to the motionless Clark as sirens are heard in the background. 

“Sir, can you move?” the female officer asks. “Can you hear us?”

At least one officer keeps a gun trained on Clark the entire time and, for a few moments, the second of the first two officers on the scene suggests firing a non-lethal weapon at his body to ensure he isn’t faking unconsciousness, the footage shows. It does not appear that the officers did so.

A few minutes later, the footage shows the officers finally approaching Clark’s body. 

“Hey, if one of you guys want to go hands, cover him … oh, (expletive),” the second officer says as they get to Clark.

The body camera shows the edge of something flat and light-colored peeking out from underneath his body. As they handcuff his limp hands behind his back and turn him over to start CPR, their flashlights show what the item is.

It is the iPhone Clark was carrying.

FBI investigated Jeff Sessions for possible perjury: reports

The FBI investigated U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions for possible perjury last year amid allegations that he misled lawmakers about his contacts with Russians ahead of the 2016 presidential election, according to multiple reports.

>> Read more trending news

The investigation into Sessions started before the appointment of special counsel Robert Mueller, who is tasked with probing Russian efforts to meddle in the election and possible ties to President Donald Trump and his campaign officials, Sessions’s lawyer, Chuck Cooper, told The New York Times. The investigation into Sessions has since been closed, Cooper said.

>> Related: Who is Jeff Sessions, the new Attorney General?

“The special counsel’s office has informed me that after interviewing the attorney general and conducting additional investigation, the attorney general is not under investigation for false statements or perjury in his confirmation hearing testimony and related written submissions to Congress,” Cooper told the Times in a statement.

Sessions told lawmakers during his January 2017 confirmation hearing that he had no communications with Russians during Trump’s campaign for the White House, but he faced criticism after it was reported by The Washington Post that Sessions met twice with Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak.

>> Related: Democrats call for Sessions' resignation over meetings with Russian ambassador

Sessions claimed he didn’t remember meeting with Kislyak, according to Bloomberg News. He emphasized in a statement released after the Post’s report that he “never met with any Russian officials to discuss issues of the campaign.”

Unidentified sources told multiple media outlets, including the Times, Bloomberg and ABC News, that Sessions was unaware of the investigation when he announced the decision Friday to fire FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe.

>> Related: Why was Andrew McCabe fired? What we know now

McCabe authorized and oversaw the federal criminal investigation into Sessions, according to ABC News. The news network was the first to report Wednesday on the investigation.

The FBI frequently launches perjury investigations based on congressional referrals, according to the Times, though it’s rare for such investigations to lead to charges.

>> Related: Sessions interviewed by Mueller team as part of Russia probe, report says

Mueller’s team interviewed Sessions in January. Cooper told the Times that officials with the special counsel’s office have since told him that the attorney general was considered a witness in the case.

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