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'Gotti' leads Razzie nominations, Trump up for worst actor

John Travolta's John Gotti biopic "Gotti" has topped the 39th annual Razzie Awards with a co-leading six nominations, while President Donald Trump also earned a nod for worst actor.

In nominations announced Monday, "Gotti," the Will Ferrell comedy "Holmes & Watson," conservative provocateur Dinesh D'Souza's "Death of a Nation" and the R-rated puppet comedy "Happytime Murders" all earned six nominations.

Nominated for worst picture are "Gotti," ''The Happytime Murders," ''Holmes & Watson," ''Robin Hood" and "Winchester."

Along with Johnny Depp in "Sherlock Gnomes" and Travolta in "Gotti," the Razzies nominated Trump in "Death of a Nation" and Michael Moore's "Fahrenheit 11/9" for worst actor. It also nominated Trump and "his self-perpetuating pettiness" for worst screen combo. Melania Trump was nominated for worst supporting actress.

Winners will be revealed Feb. 23.

Atlanta natives Chloe x Halle to sing ‘America the Beautiful’ at Super Bowl

Atlanta natives and Grammy-nominated sister singing duo Chloe x Halle will sing “America the Beautiful” before Super Bowl LIII, the NFL announced Sunday.

>> Read more trending news 

The group joins the previously announced Gladys Knight in the pre-game festivities at Mercedes-Benz Stadium on Feb. 3. Knight is set to sing the national anthem.

Chloe and Halle Bailey, just 20 and 18 years old respectively, were born in Atlanta and caught the attention of Beyoncé in 2013 after posting a cover of her song “Pretty Hurts” on YouTube.

They were subsequently signed to her label Parkwood Entertainment and released their debut album “The Kids Are Alright” last year. Their vocal talent and contemporary R&B style earned them Grammy nominations for best new artist and best urban contemporary album for next month’s ceremony.

>> Related: Gladys Knight explains her decision to sing the national anthem

They also opened for Beyoncé and Jay-Z’s joint “On The Run II” tour last year, and star on the show “Grown-ish.”

They previously sang the national anthem at the NFL Draft in 2017.

Former CIA officer portrayed in 'Argo' film dead at 78

A former CIA technical operations officer who helped rescue six U.S. diplomats from Iran in 1980 and was portrayed by Ben Affleck in the film "Argo," has died. He was 78.

A family statement and his literary agent confirmed that Antonio "Tony" Mendez died Saturday at an assisted-living center in Frederick, Maryland. He had suffered from Parkinson's disease, according to the statement.

Specializing in covert operations, Mendez helped devise the plan under which six diplomats who were in hiding were disguised as a Canadian film crew so they could board a flight and escape the country amid the Iran hostage crisis. The daring plot — for years a side note to the 52 people held hostage for 444 days — captured the public's attention in "Argo," which won the 2013 Oscar for best picture.

Mendez, who joined the CIA after getting recruited in 1965, spent his 25-year career working undercover in Cold War battlegrounds, including the Soviet Union. Working as a "chief of disguise," Mendez and his workers helped secret agents remain secret through creating false documents and disguises, according to a biography for his first book, "The Master of Disguise; My Secret Life in the CIA."

"Tony Mendez was a true American hero. He was a man of extraordinary grace, decency, humility and kindness," Affleck tweeted Saturday. "He never sought the spotlight for his actions, he merely sought to serve his country. I'm so proud to have worked for him and to have told one of his stories."

The "Argo" screenplay, based on another Mendez memoir and also an Oscar winner, was liberally embellished for the big screen. The six Americans' passage through the Tehran airport and onto a plane was uneventful, Mendez wrote. But the movie portrayed a white-knuckle takeoff at the Tehran airport, with Iranian assault teams racing behind the jet down the runway.

Born in Nevada, Mendez moved to Colorado at age 14, attended the University of Colorado and worked for Martin Marietta on the Titan intercontinental missile, according to the online biography . He was recruited for the CIA in Denver through a blind ad. In less than two years, the biography says, he and his family had moved overseas while Mendez worked in South and Southeast Asia.

His wife, Jonna, is also a former chief of disguise in the CIA's Office of Technical Service. The two wrote a book about their agency work in Moscow in the final days of the Cold War and their romance, which led to their marriage after he retired in 1990. Mendez was also an accomplished painter.

His family says he will be buried in a private ceremony at the family graveyard in Nevada.

Hedi Slimane unveils debut menswear show for Celine in Paris

Passers-by gathered outside the giant glass windows of Celine's traffic-stopping show venue Sunday night: erected in Paris' sparkling Place de la Concorde, which is also used as a traffic circle.

Designer Hedi Slimane's debut menswear effort for Celine — the most highly anticipated show of the season — also drew the stars inside, including Courtney Love. All were all eager to see the new face of the age-old Parisian stalwart that's historically always been associated with dressing women.

Here are some highlights of Sunday's installment of Paris Fashion Week.

HEDI SLIMANE

Has Hedi Slimane lost some of his attitude?

The former Saint Laurent designer who courts controversy and provokes outrage from fashion editors at almost every turn seems to have turned a new leaf.

Sunday's menswear debut for Celine showed a different side to the enfant terrible of Paris fashion, one that was restrained and even conservative (relatively).

Clean silhouettes that riffed on the '60s included a checked coat in luxuriant-looking wool or a slim tweed coat. Color was used sparingly.

Slimane's unkempt, waiflike and shaggy-haired models were still there stomping down the runway, as were the retro Teddy Boy touches like winkle picker shoes, white socks and a few statement sparkling jackets.

But this new Celine man had a distinctly bourgeois feel.

Even signature Slimane garments that would have once been provocative, like a yellow faux-zebra coat, looked restrained owing to their simple and balanced proportion.

Was it a little bit low-energy?

COURTNEY LOVE GETS CANDID

Decked out in a black velvet top, an excited Love sat front row at Celine as she looked upon the Arc de Triomphe and Eiffel Tower.

"I think it's going to be fantastic. What Hedi (Slimane) does is amazing and it's an honor to be here," she said.

Love has been writing her memoirs for some years that recounts key moments in her life including with late-Nirvana singer Kurt Cobain.

But she told The Associated Press that she's struggled with the writing process.

"My book is three-quarters of the way done. It's horrible. It's hard to concentrate. That's why it's taking so long," she said.

She said her 26-year-old daughter, Frances Bean Cobain, Cobain's daughter is one of the main reasons she's writing to help her child make sense of a life marked by a father's untimely death in 1994.

"My daughter really is my muse. I'm doing it so that she understands things in her life," she added.

KENZO DESIGNER'S ROOTS

Psychedelic Peruvian paintings covered panel upon panel of Kenzo's fall menswear show that celebrated of one of the designer's Chinese-Peruvian heritage.

The set, painted by artist Pablo Amaringo, evoked scenes inspired by the hallucinogenic Amazonian "ayahuasca" drug — with multicolor space ships, jungle, parrots and deer merging into one — and had some fashion guests squinting amid fluorescent lighting.

Designer Humberto Leon's family is Tusan, a Peruvian people whose ancestors arrived in Latin America in the 19th century from Guangdong province in China.

The theme provided a rich fashion tapestry in the clothes — from Andean mountaineering styles with woolies, fun hiking boots, utilitarian rucksacks and amassed layering, to ethnic textiles in flashes of bright color.

Beyond the encyclopedic theme, there were some trendy touches in deconstruction — such as a series of cross jackets with Asian-style cinched waists that sported the inner sleeve lining on the outside.

BENDING THE GENDER RULES

A number of houses have in recent seasons been bending the set rules and showing women's pre-collections or women's ready-to-wear during the back-to-back menswear and couture calendar such as Proenza Schouler and Rodarte.

It maximizes visibility to designs in front of world's fashion press. Other houses have started to combine women's and men's collections, like Saint Laurent, in a cost-effective move that reduces the amount of glitzy presentations they are obliged to put on each year.

Kenzo used the menswear media spotlight Sunday to showcase the women's fall-winter ready-to-wear as part of the same runway show.

The styles borrowed from some of the menswear themes as they riffed on Andean references, and included some wacky style twists such as colored feather boas, stoles and hats that gave the female designs a slightly 1920s Parisian feel.

Gender fluidity is a hot theme in the increasingly androgynous landscape in Paris fashion. Labels such as Maison Margiela have gone co-ed in recent collections, as designers blur the boundaries between men's and women's clothes in a bid to produce genderless designs.

JACQUEMUS DREAMS OF BLUER SKIES

Much-feted womenswear designer Jacquemus returned to male designs Sunday, one year after the young French designer expanded his lines into menswear with a show in southern France.

Simon Porte Jacquemus, 29, found fashion fame for his relaxed, summery women's styles that harkened to his native city of Marseille on the Mediterranean coast.

Here in Paris, and in menswear, the fall-winter collection captured this nonchalant, sunny vibe in light open white cotton sweaters with an outdoors motif, a loose double (backslash)-breasted yellow suit worn against bare skin and an unseasonably bright color palette.

An olive tree that made up the set decor glistened in the background and contrasted with the misty Parisian weather outside.

Broad square pockets and boxy proportions provided one new style idea, but the show was too relaxed for its own good and lacked the creative energy of his women's designs.

Its most potent effect was to spur on fatigued fashionistas to yearn for bluer skies and warmer temperatures.

___

Thomas Adamson can be followed at www.twitter.com/ThomasAdamson_K

M. Night Shyamalan's 'Glass' is No. 1 with $40.6M debut

M. Night Shyamalan scored his fifth No. 1 movie as the director's "Glass," while not quite the blockbuster some expected, nevertheless dominated Martin Luther King Jr. holiday weekend at the box office with $40.6 million in ticket sales according to studio estimates Sunday.

Universal Pictures predicted that "Glass" will make about $47 million over the four-day holiday weekend. Some industry forecasts had gone as high as $75 million over four days. But poor reviews took some of the momentum away from "Glass," Shyamalan's final entry in a trilogy begun with 2000's "Unbreakable" and followed up with 2017's "Split."

Shyamalan's film registered a 35 percent "fresh" rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Audiences also gave it a mediocre B Cinema Score.

Yet the result still proved the renewed draw of Shyamalan, the "Sixth Sense" filmmaker synonymous with supernatural thrillers and unpredictable plot twists. "Split," which greatly overshot expectations with a $40 million opening and $278.5 million worldwide, signaled Shyamalan's return as a box-office force, now teamed up with horror factory Blumhouse Productions. Shyamalan, himself, put up the film's approximately $20 million budget.

Jim Orr, president of domestic distribution for Universal, said any forecasts beyond how "Glass" performed were out of whack with the studio's own expectations. Orr granted that better reviews might have meant a larger return and that the winter storm across the Midwest and Northeast may have dampened results.

But he said Universal was thrilled with the results. The four-day total ranks "Glass" as the third best MLK weekend openings ever, behind only "American Sniper" ($107.2 million) and "Ride Along" ($48.6 million). "Glass" also picked up $48.5 million overseas, where Disney had distribution rights.

"This came in at or above any reasonable industry expectations," said Orr.

Last week's top film, Kevin Hart's "The Upside," held especially well in its second weekend, sliding only 23 percent with $15.7 million. STX Entertainment estimated it will take $19.5 million over the four-day period, offering further proof that Hart's fallout as Oscar host over past homophobic tweets hasn't hurt his box office appeal.

But the weekend's biggest surprise was the Japanese anime film "Dragon Ball Super: Broly," which earned an estimated $8.7 million on the weekend from just 1,250 North American theaters, according to Comscore, and $19.5 million since opening Wednesday. (It grossed more than $7 million just on opening day.) The Funimation Films release, an animated martial arts fantasy, is the 20th film in the "Dragon Ball" franchise.

The result for "Dragon Ball Super: Broly" caught Hollywood off guard, prompting many to wonder: Just what is Dragon Ball? And who is Broly? (A nutty anime series created by Akira Toriyama, and the film's warrior antagonist, respectively.)

"The enthusiasm for this movie was certainly reflected in these much bigger than expected numbers for a title that I don't think anyone was that aware of, other than the true fans," said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for Comscore. "If you ask the average moviegoer if they've ever heard of 'Dragon Ball Super: Broly,' they'd have absolutely no idea what you're talking about."

Shyamalan and Broly could do only so much for the overall marketplace. Other studios held back new wide releases to avoid going head-to-head with "Glass." The box office was down 18.4 percent from the same weekend last year when "Jumanji: Welcome the Jungle" was still packing theaters, according to Comscore.

Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to Comscore. Where available, the latest international numbers for Friday through Sunday are also included. Final domestic figures will be released Monday.

1. "Glass," $40.6 million ($48.5 million international).

2. "The Upside," $15.7 million.

3. "Aquaman," $10.3 million ($14.3 million international).

4. "Dragon Ball Super: Broly," $8.7 million ($5.3 million international).

5. "Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse," $7.3 million.

6. "A Dog's Way Home," $7.1 million ($2.8 million international).

7. "Escape Room," $5.3 million ($9.5 million international).

8. "Mary Poppins," $5.2 million ($6 million international).

9. "Bumblebee," $4.7 million ($20.9 million international).

10. "On the Basis of Sex," $4 million.

___

Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at international theaters (excluding the U.S. and Canada), according to Comscore.

1. "Glass," $48.5 million.

2. "Bumblebee," $20.9 million.

3. "Aquaman," $14.3 million.

4. "Bohemian Rhapsody," $11.3 million.

5. "How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World," $10.8 million.

6. "White Snake," $9.9 million.

7. "Escape Room," $9.5 million.

8. "Ralph Breaks the Internet," $9.2 million.

9. "The Big Shot," $8.9 million.

10. "Mary Queen of Scots," $6.4 million.

___

Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP

Bon Jovi's restaurant to serve free meal to federal workers furloughed during shutdown

As many federal workers go without paychecks during the partial government shutdown, rock star Jon Bon Jovi is stepping up to help.

>> ‘SNL’ takes on government shutdown with 'Deal or No Deal' parody

According to WNBC, the "Livin' on a Prayer" singer and his wife, Dorothea Hurley, own JBJ Soul Kitchen, a nonprofit New Jersey restaurant whose customers usually volunteer or make a donation in exchange for meals. But thanks to a partnership with the Murphy Family Foundation, furloughed federal employees can eat for free from noon to 2 p.m. Monday at the restaurant's Red Bank location. 

>> Trump offers deal to end shutdown in Saturday speech

"In line with our mission, federal workers are encouraged to join us for a delicious meal and to learn about additional support and resources available in our community," the restaurant said in a Facebook post Saturday.

>> See the post here

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news 

In a statement, Bon Jovi and Hurley said they wanted to "create a place of support and resources for furloughed federal workers, many of whom are our friends and neighbors," WNBC reported.

>> Read more trending news 

The couple also said they are "thrilled" to be working on the project with New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy and his wife, Tammy, who run the Murphy Family Foundation.

Read more here.

'Rambo,' 'Total Recall' producer Andy Vajna dies at 74

Andy Vajna, a Hungarian-American film producer who worked on several "Rambo" movies with Sylvester Stallone, "Total Recall" with Arnold Schwarzenegger and Madonna's "Evita," has died. He was 74.

Vajna, who produced many other films, died Sunday at his Budapest home after a long illness, Hungary's National Film Fund said.

Schwarzenegger remembered Vajna as "a dear friend and a revolutionary force in Hollywood."

"He proved that you don't need studios to make huge movies," Schwarzenegger posted on Twitter. "He had a huge heart, and he was one of the most generous guys around. I'll miss him."

Stallone paid tribute to Vajna on Instagram, calling him "a pioneer" and "the man that made Rambo" happen. Vajna believed in "First Blood," the first Rambo film, "when no one else did. This truly breaks my heart," Stallone said.

Vajna was also owner of the TV2 Group, a Hungarian company which owns several television channels, including TV2, one of Hungary's two main broadcasters and politically aligned closely with Prime Minister Viktor Orban's government.

"We are bidding farewell to the greatest Hungarian film producer," Orban posted on his Facebook page. "Hasta la vista, Andy! Thank you for everything, my friend!"

Since 2011, Vajna had been a commissioner in the Orban government, in charge of developing Hungary's film industry.

Hungarian films have won several top prizes at recent international festivals. In 2016, "Son of Saul," financed mostly by Hungary's National Film Fund, won the Oscar for best foreign language film.

Vajna, who enjoyed a state-granted monopolistic concession on Budapest casinos, was recently listed by the Hungarian edition of Forbes magazine as the 18th richest Hungarian, with a net worth estimated at nearly $240 million. He also owned Radio 1, a radio station popular across the country.

The producer was born Andras Gyorgy Vajna in Budapest on Aug. 1, 1944, and escaped Hungary's communist regime in 1956 with help from the International Red Cross. After some time in Canada, he was reunited with his family in Los Angeles.

After studying at UCLA, Vajna operated cinemas in Hong Kong, where he also established a successful wig-making company.

In the mid-1970s, Vajna set up Carolco, a film production firm, with Mario Kassar. Besides the Rambo series, the two men were also behind films like "Victory" — starring Stallone, Michael Caine and Pele; "Red Heat" and "Total Recall," starring Schwarzenegger; and "Angel Heart" and "Johnny Handsome" with Mickey Rourke.

After leaving Carolco in 1989, Vajna's films included "Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines," ''Die Hard with a Vengeance," ''The Scarlet Letter," ''Nixon" and "I Spy."

He also produced several successful Hungarian films and was co-owner of Korda Studios, in the village of Etyek, near Budapest, where "The Martian," ''Inferno" and "Hellboy II: The Golden Army" were filmed.

Late last year, Vajna was among a handful of businesspeople close to Orban who donated most of their media holdings to a nonprofit foundation overseen by an Orban ally, a move which put over 470 publications under even closer political control.

Vajna is survived by his wife, Timea.

'SNL' takes on government shutdown with 'Deal or No Deal' parody

The government shutdown got the game show treatment as "Saturday Night Live" returned to TV screens this weekend.

>> Government shutdown: Senate to take up Trump plan this week

Saturday's episode, hosted by actress Rachel Brosnahan, didn't waste any time tackling the issue, pitting Alec Baldwin's Donald Trump against parodies of Democratic leaders in a "Deal or No Deal" spoof.

>> Watch the sketch here

"We decided to do this in the only format you can understand – a TV game show with women holding briefcases," Kenan Thompson, playing Steve Harvey, told Baldwin's Trump as the game began. 

>> Trump offers deal to end shutdown in Saturday speech

The fake Trump opened with an offer to extend Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals and "release the kids from cages so they can be free-range kids" in exchange for $5 billion toward a border wall. But House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (Kate McKinnon) wasn't having it.

"OK, $1 billion and you say, 'Nancy's my mommy,'" she countered, opening a briefcase bearing the same words. 

Baldwin's Trump refused, then called on Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (Alex Moffat).

>> Read more trending news 

"My offer is whatever you want," Moffat's Schumer said before changing his offer to, "$15 and a pastrami on rye."

Baldwin's Trump also turned to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Beck Bennett) and Democratic U.S. Reps. Maxine Waters (Leslie Jones) and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (Melissa Villaseñor) before accepting a deal from a Clemson football player (Pete Davidson) with a box of fast food.

"Hamberders," it read – a reference to a spelling mistake in one of Trump's tweets.

Read more here.

UK police speak to Prince Philip about not wearing seatbelt

British police have spoken with Prince Philip after the husband of Queen Elizabeth II was photographed apparently driving without wearing a seatbelt — just two days after he was involved in a serious car crash.

British media on Saturday published a photograph showing the 97-year-old royal driving a new Land Rover near the royal residence at Sandringham in eastern England.

Norfolk Police said "suitable words of advice have been given to the driver."

Police said the advice given to Philip was "in line with our standard response when being made aware of such images showing this type of offense."

Buckingham Palace didn't comment on the images.

Philip was driving another Land Rover when he was involved in a violent collision on Thursday in which two women in a Kia car were injured. A 9-month-old baby boy in the Kia was unhurt. Philip had to be helped out of his overturned vehicle but wasn't injured.

The palace said Friday that Philip and the queen had privately contacted the other people in the crash and exchanged good wishes.

But Emma Fairweather, who broke her wrist in the collision, told the Sunday Mirror newspaper that she had not heard from the palace.

"I still haven't had any contact from the royal household," she said. "Maybe he should prioritize that over test driving his new car."

The 46-year-old said "it would mean the world to me" if Philip offered an apology.

Police haven't disclosed who was at fault for the crash, which happened after Philip drove onto a main road from a side road near the royal family's Sandringham estate, 100 miles (160 kilometers) north of London.

The queen and Philip have been on an extended Christmas break in Sandringham, their holiday tradition for many years.

Philip has been in generally good health and was photographed in December driving a horse-drawn carriage. He has largely retired from public life but still is occasionally seen at family occasions with the queen.

The accident — and Philip's subsequent driving apparently without using a seatbelt — is raising questions about his continued use of public roadways.

Buckingham Palace says Philip has a valid driver's license. There is no upper age limit for licensing drivers in Britain, although drivers over 70 are required to renew their licenses every three years and tell authorities about any medical conditions that might raise safety issues.

Philip passed a vision test Saturday as part of the investigation into the accident.

'Green Book' takes top honor at the Producers Guild Awards

The Oscars race may have gotten a little clearer Saturday night as the race-themed road trip drama "Green Book" drove off with the top honor at the Producers Guild Awards, winning out over presumed front-runners like "Roma," ''A Star Is Born" and "Black Panther."

"When you make 'Dumb and Dumber' you never expect to get an award," said "Green Book" producer and director Peter Farrelly as he accepted the Darryl F. Zanuck Award at the untelevised ceremony in Beverly Hills. He laughed that not only is this his first PGA awards, but that it's the first time he has even heard of them.

"I'm so grateful to be in this business," Farrelly said.

Ten films were up for the honor, including "BlacKkKlansman," ''Bohemian Rhapsody," ''Crazy Rich Asians," ''The Favourite," ''A Quiet Place" and "Vice." In the broader awards race, the PGAs are a closely-watched event. The Darryl F. Zanuck Award winner has gone on to win the best picture Oscar 20 out of 29 times, including last year with "The Shape of Water."

"Green Book" has had a rollercoaster awards campaign, weathering its share of both praise and backlash. But the film has with its PGA and Golden Globe wins emerged stronger than ever going into Tuesday's Academy Award nominations.

The Fred Rogers film "Won't You Be My Neighbor?" won for documentary, and "Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse" collected the animation award to much applause.

"We tried really hard to make a movie that was good enough for Miles Morales and his family to be in," said "Spider-Verse" producer and co-writer Phil Lord.

The producers of nine television programs were also recognized, including "The Americans," for drama, "The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel," for comedy, "RuPaul's Drag Race," game and competition television, "Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown," for non-fiction television, and "The Assassination of Gianni Versace" for limited series. "Sesame Street" won for children's programming, "Being Serena" for sports program and "Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee" for short form.

The awards were almost a backdrop, however, to the multiple special honors bestowed throughout the evening to people like Marvel chief Kevin Feige, Jane Fonda, "Black-ish" creator Kenya Barris, Warner Bros. Pictures Group Chairman Toby Emmerich and "The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel" creator Amy Sherman-Palladino.

Bradley Cooper got to thank Emmerich for taking a chance in letting him, a first-time director, make the fourth remake of a movie ("A Star Is Born") with a star who had never been in a movie before.

"I'm so proud to have been your wingman on your maiden voyage," Emmerich said accepting the Milestone Award. "Please count me in on many more journeys."

Robert Downey Jr. was on hand to introduce Feige, the David O. Selznick Achievement Award recipient, who he said "MEDVACed me from the top of insurance-risk mountain and delivered me to the upper-middle of the Forbes list."

Feige thanked Downey Jr., but noted that he "hasn't aged a day" since they made the first "Iron Man" over 10 years ago.

"I on the other hand look like I picked the wrong grail," Feige said. "It's an 'Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade' reference!"

Barris would also reference Feige's oeuvre when accepting the Visionary Award, speaking about how Norman Lear taught him as a kid about "the importance of representation and seeing yourself."

"Black Panther," he said, did something similar.

"You always hear the notion that black movies don't travel," Barris said. "They told an African fairytale, and it's the third biggest movie of all time. What that said to me was that humanity translates. Telling good stories to people anywhere from your heart translates."

Norman Lear, who was there to introduce Barris, but did not present the award named after him to Sherman-Palladino, was also an oft-mentioned name.

"He taught sitcom writers how to write sitcoms," she said.

Lear, later, said that listening to her talk about him made for "the most delicious evening I can remember."

But it was perhaps Jane Fonda who had one of the best moments of the evening, getting up to accept the Stanley Kramer Award, and noting that she actually knew all the guys the awards were named after.

"It is fun to be old" she said. "It is so hard to be young."

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